FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

WHAT IS AN AED?

AED stands for Automated External Defibrillator—the “shock box.” When a victim’s heart stops, in over 90% of adult cases the heart will go into an erratic rhythm called ventricular fibrillation—this victim must be de-fibrillated immediately in order to survive. The only known way to defibrillate is with an electrical shock. If the shock is on-board within one minute, the victim has a greater than 90% chance of survival. 

Every minute thereafter, the chance of survival goes down by 10%. Waiting for the ambulance isn’t enough.  The AED empowers you to save a life before EMS even arrives.

 

WHAT WOULD I DO?

If you find someone not breathing and unresponsive, you will call 911 and get the AED.  When you turn the AED on, it will tell you to place the electrode pads on the victim's bare chest.  The AED will begin analyzing the victim's heart rhythm immediately.  If the victim needs to be shocked, the AED will begin to charge and tell you to push the shock button, a flashing orange light.  You push the shock button and the first shock will be delivered.  If another shock is needed, the AED will tell you to shock again.  If no shock is needed, you will continue CPR until the machine needs to shock again.  This is repeated until the victim starts breathing, or EMS arrives. 

 

WHAT IF I ACCIDENTALLY SHOCK SOMEONE?

You can’t accidentally shock someone.  (And no one can accidentally shock you.)  Even if you accidentally hit the shock button, the AED will not go off.  The only time you will be able to shock is if the AED tells you that a shock is advised and it tells you to push the shock button.  The machine decides whether to deliver a shock or not.

 

IS IT A WASTE OF TIME TO PERFORM CPR?

No.  The purpose of CPR is to buy the victim more time.  If  you call 911 and immediately begin CPR, the  victim’s brain has not been without oxygen.  To increase your chances of saving the victim dramatically, use an AED immediately along with CPR.

 

CAN I GET SUED FOR USING AN AED?

The Good Samaritan Law in all 50 states now fully covers bystanders to use the AED.  Additionally, the Philips HeartStart AED has an unlimited manufacturer’s indemnification.  The most prominent lawsuits today are for not having an AED.  Education for Life implements an incredibly strong program including emergency planning and training to protect you from litigation.

 

HOW DO I GET AN AED?

Education for Life offers a complete program. We provide complimentary site surveys, program proposals, medical direction, policies and procedures, emergency planning, maintenance and local EMS notification—all at no cost to you. 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Education For Life

Safety​ Consulting

 

T:  678-722-1247
email :  Andrea@EducationforLifeGA.com

© 2015 by Education for Life SAFETY CONSULTING.  

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